Brian, Rankings, Third Base

Brian’s Top 15 Third Basemen Rankings and Projections for ’14


I don’t really feel like adding any obnoxious intro for these guys. So enjoy the video and the rankings.

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Brian, Rankings, Third Base

Brian’s Top 14 Third Basemen Rankings and Projections for ’13


"Follow me to freedom!"

“Follow me to freedom!”

I always struggle to come up with a good story line or metaphor for the third basemen. Last year I wrote about how I finally succumbed to the reality that Jose Bautista was actually a good player; and, of course, he got hurt. For two years I fought the Bautista bandwagon. But he finally broke me down. Like a player who is hitting on a pretty girl at a bar; his charm knocked down all my walls. And then, with one quick motion, he ripped my heart out, and as I stood there, looking at my heart leisurely beating on the bar, I knew it would happen like this. It couldn’t have ended any other way.

Thankfully, Jose is no longer a third baseman. So, I just wasted a paragraph, and three minutes of your precious time.

This is the first year that Miguel Cabrera will enter the season with third base eligibility since the 2009 season (depending on your eligibility rules). He wasn’t even on this list last year, as I refuse to rank players at a position who have yet to gain that eligibility. Gosh, I’m saying eligibility a lot. Cabrera is easily the best third baseman, and quite possibly the best player in Major League Baseball, depending on who you talk to. I’ve said for years, Miguel Cabrera is the key to a fantasy championship. Go ahead, try and argue against it.

I wrote extensively about how I dislike Chase Headley this year, only to end up with him in a 12-team keeper league this past weekend ($17 in an auction draft; got caught trying to raise the price on him. Truly thought he would go for much more). You can read about my reasoning by following the link on his name.

Like I said, I find it hard to come up with metaphors for these guys. So here are the rankings.

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all-star, Awards, Brian

Major League All-Star Game: A Fallible Process


How do you measure greatness? What does it mean to be “the best”? In most cases, people who are in a certain industry control and dictate value. Art critics and appraisers decide how much a painting is worth. Directors, actors, producers, and writers choose which movies will win an Oscar or Golden Globe. Day traders determine the cost of stocks. In baseball experts decide who…hold on…that doesn’t sound right.

Since 1970, fans of Major League Baseball have decided which players would start the All-Star Game (excluding the starting pitcher), supposedly picking “the best” players at each position.

One problem with this is, while baseball is America’s pastime, 90% of baseball fans know diddly squat about the game itself. An average fan doesn’t know statistics. An average fan, even if he or she attends 10, 20, 30 games a year, goes more for the atmosphere (beer, hot dogs, “oohh look that one guy hit the ball over the fence and scored us another point”) than a deep interest in outcome and stats.

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