Brian, Projections, Rankings, Second Base

Brian’s Top-13 Second Basemen Rankings and Projections for ’14


Robinson Cano might be shipwrecked in Seattle for years.

Robinson Cano might be shipwrecked in Seattle for years.

With less than a week before Opening Day in San Diego between the Padres and Dodgers, we release our second basemen rankings and projections. In the coming days, there will be rankings and projections for third, shortstop, outfield, starting and relief pitching. Check back here throughout the week for those. Here are the rankings for second base. [Note: Jurickson Profar has been struck out due to a 2-3 month stint on the DL].

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Brian, Outfield, Rankings

Brian’s Top 31 Outfielder Rankings and Projections for ’13


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Braun proved that not even controversy can slow him down.

I was rereading my outfield rankings for the 2012 season and, while I had a few players pegged perfectly, overall I’d missed the mark on many occasions. I wasn’t high enough on guys like Mike Trout and Bryce Harper (but who really saw two 20 and unders taking the league by storm?). I didn’t give Andrew McCutchen enough credit (I won’t make the same mistake this year). I was bullish on Justin Upton’s ascension, but he regressed instead. I was a mess.

Because there are so many outfielders, it’s tremendously difficult to calculate. In the following rankings, I’m sure some players near the bottom of my rankings will have career years, while some players near the top will have lamentable seasons. As a fantasy manager, you can’t project those occurrences. All you can do is look at track record (most recent stats being most important) and cross your fingers.

Even though I have Trout as my number two outfielder (and in a few weeks he’ll be ranked pretty highly in my top-100), you can’t expect him to have the same stats from last year. His peripherals suggest a decline, mainly in his power and batting average. Some super fanatics will suggest that Trout should be the number one outfielder off the board, but I’ll take the more projectable Ryan Braun in every draft.

This is supposed to be the year that Jason Heyward becomes “fantasy elite,” and he’s got a great chance to do it (he’s surrounded by outstanding talent). But Heyward still hasn’t shown that he can drive in runs consistently. I’d much rather have Adam Jones a round or two later.

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Brian, Projections, Rankings, Second Base

Brian’s Top 13 Second Basemen Rankings and Projections for ’13


Cano is the last solid rock in the once great Yankee lineup.

Cano is the last solid rock in the once great Yankee lineup.

Ever since Chase Utley fell out of the top five second basemen two years ago, this list hasn’t dramatically changed very much. But just because this list is more stagnant than an African pond infested with malaria carrying mosquitos, doesn’t mean we aren’t going to go in for a dip.

The top five in this position are staple guys. They’ve been at or near the top for years now. You can pretty much look at what they did the year before and expect similar, if not identical production. Robinson Cano is a perfect example of this. Over the past three years Cano has reached 100 R, 28 HR, and nearly 100 RBI (last season he dipped in this department). Dustin Pedroia, who does come with his fair share of risk due to injury, is easily the number two second basemen when healthy because of his speed and power. But the most consistent source of HR and SB is Brandon Phillips, who has produced exactly 18 HR in each of the past three seasons to go with SB totals of 16, 14, and 15.

Last year I incorrectly had Dustin Ackley above Jason Kipnis in my rankings. While Ackley was a more consistent player (consistently poor, in fact), Kipnis produced the better end of season numbers, by far. Neither of these two players are slam dunks, but both have immense upside if they ever produce what they’ve been expected to do.

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Brian, Outfield, Rankings

Brian’s Top 25 Outfielder Rankings and Projections for ’12


PEDs or not, Kemp and Braun were roto-studs in '11.

I was rereading my outfield rankings for the 2011 season and, while I had a few players pegged perfectly, overall I’d missed the mark on many occasions. I wasn’t high enough on Jacoby Ellsbury or Curtis Granderson (but who was?). I didn’t give Jose Bautista enough credit (I won’t make the same mistake this year). I was bullish on Carl Crawford moving to Boston. I fell in love with Jason Heyward. I was a mess.

Because there are so many outfielders, it’s tremendously difficult to calculate. In the following rankings, I’m sure some players near the bottom of my rankings will have career years, while some players near the top will have lamentable seasons. As a fantasy manager, you can’t project those occurrences. All you can do is look at track record (most recent stats being most important) and cross your fingers.

My inclination is to take stable outfielders. Those guys who don’t have terribly high ceilings, but their floor is well above sea level.

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Brian, Projections, Rankings, Second Base

Brian’s Top 15 Second Basemen Rankings and Projections for ’12


Lots of 2B talent in the AL East.

Once again, the two baggers are top heavy. But the new trend in this position is the amount of deployable, affordable lower tier players. Let’s take a gander, shall we?

The cream of this year’s crop: Robbie Cano, Dustin Pedroia, Ian Kinsler, and Dan Uggla. In standard ten-team leagues, these four are rare species outside of the first three rounds. They are well documented and well followed and well liked by all who document and follow them. They are head and shoulders above the rest, but the usability of the rest is what is worth talking about. So to make this quick, Robbie: stud; Dustin: stud #2; Ian: troll boy; Dan: the man. Moving on…

What you’ll notice about the projections for the rest is the numbers look pretty similar to each other. Brandon Phillips looks like Chase Utley. Utley looks like Dustin Ackley. Ackley looks like Neil Walker. If you’re willing to take a player who isn’t a household name, you’re probably going to be better off with the lower tiered guys. If you’re really looking for a lunch ticket, you’ll wait super late and draft Jason Kipnis, who, surprisingly, looks like Ackley.

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