Brian, podcast, Rotoballs, Shorty

Rotoballs Podcast: April/May ’13


https://rotoballs.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/rotoballs-podcast-1-0.m4a

Special thanks to Open Hand for providing the music for this episode.

[Click play on the left or the link on the right]

Brian Dorsey: Host

Brian Dorsey: Host

Ryan Short: Contributing Writer

Ryan Short: Contributing Writer

 

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Brian, Butler, Jared, podcast, Rotoballs, Spring Training

Rotoballs Offseason Podcast: Episode 4


Rotoballs Offseason Podcast: Episode 4

Special thanks to Sparta and Darkest Hour for providing the music for this episode.

Brian Dorsey

Brian Dorsey: Creator/Editor

Jared Cothren: Contributing writer

Jared Cothren: Contributing writer

 

 

 

 

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Brian, Manifesto, podcast, Rotoballs, Updates

Manifesto ’13


“If you don’t know where you’re going, you might end up someplace else.”

-Yogi Berra

The John Madden of baseball.

The John Madden of baseball.

In fantasy baseball, there’s only one place any of us wants to be: standing on the top of some virtual winners’ podium, arms reaching for the baby blue sky, cheering out to anyone and everyone, who, by the way, couldn’t care less about our magnificent triumph. We’re employed by teams that neither thank nor pay us. We’re the only ones who are fans of our successes. Fantasy baseball is like a photo; if you’re not in it, you lose interest.

Our goal “is to win the game”, regardless of who is backing us.

We want to win. But how do we do that?

The tragic (and comical) words of Mr. Berra are true: if you don’t know what you want, chances are you’ll get something you don’t want.

Fantasy baseball, even more so than fantasy football, is about preparation, reading information, being informed, making logical decisions. In football, even Kathy, the office secretary, who missed the draft (because “What’s a draft?”), won your league (because there’s no difference between skill and luck in a sport where there’s no consistency or order). While football subscribes to the chaos theory, baseball is methodical, statistical, and predictable (to an extent that it takes skill to find and comprehend trends). If football is characterized as the butterfly effect, then baseball is weather forecasting: if you know what you’re doing, you’re going to be right more times than you’re wrong.

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